What is a hammer drill used for

Are you unsure whether you need a hammer drill or a regular drill for your upcoming project?

It’s easy to get overwhelmed or confused by the different types of drills on the market. If you are looking to purchase a hammer drill, you want to make sure it’s the right tool for the project you have planned. Hammer drills are used for drilling in hard surfaces like concrete, but they can be used for other things as well.

Keep reading to learn more about what a hammer drill is typically used for to help you decide whether it’s the right kind of drill for you.

What is a hammer drill? 

A hammer drill looks a lot like a regular drill or impact driver, but this specific tool is built to be used on very hard materials like concrete. For this reason, hammer drills are most often used to drill into concrete and masonry.

For a comparison between hammer drills and impact drivers read: hammer drill vs impact driver

It’s a rotary drill that has a fast hammering action to drive through the material that you are hammering or drilling through.

What is a hammer drill used for? 

Hammer drills are a concrete worker or brick mason’s best friend. They create a fast hammering motion to drive through even the toughest of materials.

You will commonly use a hammer drill to drive things through or break up tough materials like brick, concrete, or cement. They are great for driving screws and bolts in because they can work through the material and create a secure hold for whatever you need.

Can you use a hammer drill as a regular drill?

If you need a regular drill but all you have on hand is a hammer drill, the good news is that you can use a hammer drill as a regular drill in a pinch.

You can easily turn off the hammering action on your hammer drill and it will operate just like a regular drill would. drive regular screws etc. into materials other than brick, concrete, etc. Most hammer drills have an easy-to-find on-off switch for the hammering setting. Check the manual on your hammer drill if you’re having a hard time finding it.

It’s worth mentioning that the same is not true if you have a regular drill that you want to use as a hammer drill. Regular drills do not have a hammering setting, so you would not be able to use it that way.

Can you use a hammer drill for screws?

Although the primary function of a hammer drill is to bore holes through heavy materials, it can also be used to drive screws into almost any material you can imagine.

This is the good thing about drills like a hammer drill. They are created to do a very specific task but because at the end of the day they are just a regular drill with some added features and power, they are also versatile enough to do regular tasks like driving screws.

Although hammer drills can get a regular job done, you wouldn’t necessarily want to buy a hammer drill specifically to drive screws.

Hammer drills tend to be bigger, heavier, and more expensive than a regular drill, so it’s an investment tool that you only want to purchase if you’re certain you will need the full functionality. If you don’t plan on needing to bore through or drive through hard materials like brick or concrete, save your money and purchase a regular drill.

Who needs a hammer drill?

Anyone who is looking to work with concrete or do any kind of masonry work should definitely invest in a hammer drill. It is an ideal tool for working with brick, cement, and concrete on the job.

Final Thoughts 

Hammer drills are essential for any concrete worker or brick mason’s tool bag. They are heavy, powerful drills made to effortlessly bore through hard materials like concrete, cement, or brick to pulverize material or drill screws and bolts.

A great thing about hammer drills is they are multipurpose. If you have a hammer drill, but you just need to do some regular drilling you can always turn off the hammering action and use it as a regular drill.

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Related: Best cordless hammer drills

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The Author

Daniel Smith

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